Manifold Recording / The Miraverse

November 10, 2014

Wayne Krantz coming to the Miraverse, Feb 15 2015

Filed under: creativity, education, Miraverse, news, news-miraverse, technique — Tags: , , , — Michael Tiemann @ 3:19 pm
Wayne Krantz playing his James Tyler guitar

Wayne Krantz, Premier Guitar

Guitar virtuoso and teacher Wayne Krantz and his trio are coming to the Miraverse February 15, 2015, and we are so excited!  I first learned about Wayne from the AbstractLogix catalog.  My love of the music created by John McLaughlin, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Herring, and others of that sort predicted I would like Wayne’s music.  Not because he imitates them–he most certainly doesn’t!  But because he is as boldly original as they are, bringing together an exciting mix of classic and alien, funky and beautiful, harmonic and angular.  I bought the self-titled album Krantz Carlock Lefebvre and it spent weeks in the player as I listened to it over and over and over again.

When Wayne released a book (An Improviser’s OS), I found myself falling down a rabbit hole of nearly infinite complexity.  And infinitely beautiful.  And that’s how I learned that in addition to being a creative composer and master player, he is also a teacher.

So it is fitting, then, for him to come to the Miraverse both to play, and to teach…and you can attend his lessons and/or performances by clicking here.

Still reading?  Then here’s some more motivation to come…

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July 4, 2014

A Successful Event

Filed under: Miraverse, news, news-miraverse — Tags: , , , — Michael Tiemann @ 7:19 am

Last week we hosted a benefit recital for two fellows of the A. J. Fletcher Opera Institute, Jaclyn Surso and Megan Cleaveland.  These two talented sopranos needed to raise money to offset costs to travel to Italy for the summer to study and perform under renowned soprano Renata Scotto, and we saw a perfect opportunity to help.

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June 1, 2014

La Luz del Mundo comes to Manifold Recording

Filed under: Manifold Recording, news, news-manifold — Tags: , , — Michael Tiemann @ 10:20 am

Yesterday we very very happy to host singers from several congregations of La Luz del Mundo of North Carolina. These singers came from across the state to make the first professional recording of some of their a cappella hymns.  Here is the full choir in the studio:

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May 14, 2014

Kat Robichaud studio sessions

Filed under: cd, Manifold Recording, recording studio — Tags: — Michael Tiemann @ 6:00 am

Last month Kat Robichaud and her band moved in to the studio to record an epic rock album, with Ian Schreier engineering and producing.  The process actually began some time before that, but the studio came into play for some intensive rehearsals before tracking and mixing began.  Here’s a shot of the whole band rehearsing, showing the great energy that everybody had throughout the session:

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February 14, 2014

Experience the Mixing Process at Manifold Recording

Filed under: Manifold Recording, news, news-manifold, recording studio, studio tech, technique — Tags: , , — Michael Tiemann @ 11:03 pm

Last year, John Heitzenrater and the band Hindugrass came to Manifold Recording to track their new album.  John used crowd-funding to help defray the costs of the tracking session, and to use his home studio to edit and mix the resulting tracks.  The theory was that by going “all in” on the quality of the recorded material, he would wouldn’t need all the firepower of a high-end studio to produce a good result.  But as good as the tracks were, he began to realize that his artistic vision for the album was way more complicated than just selecting the right takes, putting the faders at zero, and letting the songs mix themselves.  He began to inquire about mixing dates toward the end of the year, and we agreed to do a joint project.  We would mix the album, but he would let us produce video of the process.  We are proud to present the first fruits of that collaboration:

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January 27, 2014

Progress Report (Network and Data)

Filed under: Manifold Recording, studio tech — Tags: , , , — Michael Tiemann @ 9:39 pm

Following closely our progress report on the video capabilities of the studio, this posting details some of the major progress and changes we’ve been making to our infrastructure.  Some may find this information way too technical or way too dry, but it’s part of what makes the studio work, and I think it’s pretty cool.

To paint the picture of our network requirements, let’s start with our digital recording devices.  We have three Harrison X-dubbers that record 64 channels at 96K in 32-bit floating point.  That works out to a data rate of just under 200Mbps.  When that data goes over the network, nfs metadata and ethernet packet overheads drive that to about 220Mbps per machine, or 660Mbps if running all at once.  That’s a healthy, but not overly aggressive amount of data to push down a 1000Base-T cable.  We also have two 64-channel ProTools machines that generate such data to their own local disks.  That doesn’t put anything on the network until its time to do a backup, at which point the backup scripts may run at full disk bandwidth (80-100MB/sec bursts), which can, by itself, saturate gigabit ethernet.  To keep the backup traffic from spilling into the audio traffic, we put them on isolated subnets, effectively routing them in parallel.

Video data has become a huge X-factor in our equations.  While our two AF100 cameras have a native (and highly compressed) recording rate of 28Mbps, that rate explodes to 160Mbps when we encode directly from the SDI interface (giving us 4:2:2 resolution instead of 4:2:0).  Our two Canon EOS5D MkIII cameras record All-I video to their SD cards at 90Mbps.  Technically, these cameras all record to local media, but in reality, after an hour of recording there are four hours worth of data that need to be stored on the server.  If all we ask of our system is the ability to transfer this data in real-time, then we need a 500Mbps network to handle the traffic.  (A full 1000Base-T network could save data at 2x real-time speed.)

But the real fun begins with our newer cameras–cameras that can record at higher-than-HD resolutions.  Our Blackmagic Design Cinema Camera records 12-bit RAW files recorded at 2432 x 1366 resolution–about 40% more pixels than FullHD, with 2-3 stops more dynamic range than conventional cameras.  That camera can fill a 480GB SSD in about 65 minutes shooting 23.98 fps (and faster when shooting 29.97), which is (coincidentally?) almost exactly the flat-out limit of a 1000Base-T connection.  Blackmagic make a docking station that can accept four SDD cards and offload them at Thunderbolt (10G) speed, which was a life-saver for us when we were running three Blackmagic cameras for over two hours when we recorded Kimiko Ishizaka playing Book 1 of Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier.  At that time we had to cheat, because we simply could not get data to our servers fast enough.  But now that we have mLink boxes with 10G Myricom cards connected to our 10G-enabled server, we can offload multiple terabytes of data per hour.  That’s huge!

So this is what we now have: the ability to record audio to five 64-track devices running at 96/32, the ability to offload HD media at better-than-realtime speed from our four HD cameras, and the ability to offload data from up to four Blackmagic cameras at real-time speed, all at the same time.  That’s pretty cool!

Crucial to making all this work has been the transparency and robustness of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.  Linux has great networking support, making it easy to define many isolated networks on a single storage server.  cgroups are a simple and powerful way of binding specific tasks to specific CPUs (or even cores within a CPU).  My servers are standard-issue dual-socket Thinkmate storage servers with 8 cores per socket.  While these machines deliver great performance by default, a little tweaking went a long way to getting optimum performance from both the network and the storage subsystems.  I found that a single core was not enough to service a 10G network running at full bore, but that two cores were easily enough.  Similarly, a single core could easily handle multiple gigabit network interfaces.  Thus, by dedicating 3 of my 16 cores to networking, I could measure wire-speed performance across both gigabit and 10G network interfaces.

I’m looking forward to measuring next how well my storage systems are optimized: NFS, XFS, MD_RAID, etc.  It could well be that I don’t need to do any additional manual intervention to achieve my performance goals.  But I am very happy to know that if I do need to reach in to do something, the knowledge is there to do it, and the knobs are there to make the job easy.

In the next month we will be bringing a new data generator into the studio: a RED DRAGON camera.  For those not familiar, the RED DRAGON shoots 6K images with 16 or more stops of dynamic range.  Phil Holland produced this graphic to explain “What is 6K”:

RED cameras compress their RAW images using wavelet compress, so they can capture 6K images at 24fps at data rates ranging from 10GB/sec (at a 5:1 compression ratio) down to 2.9GB/sec (at an 18:1 ratio).  We cannot quite handle that in real-time, but if we have 4-6 hours of media we can always have a fresh card every 24 hours using multiple RAIDs and multiple 10Gb pipes.

It makes me happy that all these changes–almost unimaginable 5-10 years ago–are easily adopted, integrated, and optimized within our open source environment.

Progress Report (Video)

Filed under: Manifold Recording, Miraverse, studio tech — Tags: , , , — Michael Tiemann @ 9:30 am

It has been a while since my last blog posting, which means there is much, Much, MUCH to tell.  I’m not sure that I can do it all justice in one evening, but there are some highlights I want to hit.

In early November, pianist Kimiko Ishizaka performed Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier in the Music Room of Manifold Recording.   The event was recorded in front of a live studio audience and webcast around the word, presented by The Miraverse.  We produced two videos, one for studio geeks showing all our microphones, microphone locations, and all sorts of other studio gear that would be involved in the session, and one of Kimiko’s actual performance (which was magnificent).  Thanks again to Robert Douglass for doing the legwork to make this event possible, and to Ms. Ishizaka for sharing her life’s study and practice of Bach with us.

It was very much my intention to write a blog posting shortly after the session–especially because it was such a great experience for all who participated, but we got too busy with all that this event put into motion for us. (more…)

September 23, 2013

Success Stories

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I have been talking for some time about the virtues of kickstarter funding for music recording projects.  The indie album Move by Matt Phillips and the Philharmonic could not have been made without kickstarter funding.  But the more I learn about the world of music kickstarters, the more I see there is to learn.

The Set Chopin Free project reached its $75,000 goal scarcely two weeks into its seven week funding schedule.  It is already more than $5,000 above its funding goal, and could well surpass $100,000 by the time its funding window closes.  And the Open Well-Tempered Clavier project (launched by Robert Douglass) has already reached 50% of its $30,000 fundraising goal from more than 450 supporters in its first 5 days!  That kind of strong start virtually guarantees funding success, and leaves us only to wonder whether it will achieve 160% (like Open Goldberg Variations), 200% (like Fractal Journeys and the Twelve Tones of Bach), 350% (like the Well-Tempered Clavier Tour), 600% (like Musopen’s Set Music Free) or more than 1100% (like Amanda Palmer did in her amazing 2012 record).  The possibilities are quite wide open.  But real questions remain: how did this happen?  what does it mean?

A press release today invites the press itself to consider some more pointed questions:

If both Open Goldberg and Musopen succeed with their Kickstarter campaigns, collectively raising over $100,000 for new recordings of standard repertoire, it is probably worth asking “Who is holding classical music in shackles?” and “Why do so many people feel it is so important to set Bach and Chopin free?” (more…)

September 4, 2013

Get ready for NOW

AbstractLogix has released NOW, the new album recorded by Alex Machacek and Gary Husband at Manifold Recording.  It is an album you may well want to check out NOW!

Alex Machacek and Gary Husband in the Control Room of Manifold Recording

It is always exciting to think about what might happen when two of your favorite artists decide to team up and produce a new collaboration.  But it can also be a disappointment when the result sounds a bit like a tug-of-war between two visions, or a competition between the two artists.  NOW not only avoids the these pitfalls, but it soars above them with rare and wonderful transcendence.  Indeed, it may do for Piano and Electric Guitar what Crystal Silence did for Piano and Vibraphone.

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July 28, 2013

The Miraverse: A Salon for the 21st Century

Filed under: culture, Miraverse — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Michael Tiemann @ 1:50 pm
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Preparing the environment at The Miraverse

We are proud and fortunate to have created the inspiring space that is Manifold Recording.  But we always envisioned achieving something more than what we can do for artists, engineers, and producers.  We believe that there is a larger public sphere that is curious, excited, and even ravenous for new ideas, new experiences, new musical performances and productions.  We wanted to also create a space in which a newly-engaged public could bring new energy, new interests, and new resources to create a healthier, more vibrant, more sustainable future for music and musicians.

One thing I have learned as a former Trustee of a model Montessori school is the importance of the prepared environment. Characteristics of the prepared environment include: beauty, order, reality, simplicity and accessibility[1].  It may have required the genius of Maria Montessori to explain why these are crucial to child development (compared with, say, efficiency, authority, policy, technology, and convenience), but as adults, it is obvious to most of us that such environments are conducive to our own development, too!  Like fertile ground ready to bring forth an abundant harvest of whatever may be planted, prepared environments known as Salons helped bring about The Enlightenment by injecting academic discussion and debate into a newly formed public sphere (that was also a by-product of the Salon experience).  Adam Smith and Benjamin Franklin presented and refined their ideas at salons, “inventing” large parts of modern capitalism and modern democracy in the process.

But commerce and politics were not the exclusive subjects of salons–they were but two of myriad subjects that excited those who participated.  Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt were proof of that.  Chopin, in fact, preferred the environment of the salon to public performances. (more…)

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